image by Wikimedia Commons

This is the Citric Acid Cycle, also known as tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA cycle), the Krebs cycle, or the Szent-Györgyi–Krebs cycle.
Now, I don’t really want to describe the whole cycle, as that would be a mammoth project to undertake, but here’s a general rundown of what it does.
This series of chemical reaction is used by aerobic organisms to create energy, through the oxidation of acetate, which can be formed from fats, proteins, and carbohydrates.
In eukaryotes the citric acid cycle occurs within the mitochondria, whereas in prokaryotes it occurs in the cytosol.

image by Wikimedia Commons

This is the Citric Acid Cycle, also known as tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA cycle), the Krebs cycle, or the Szent-Györgyi–Krebs cycle.

Now, I don’t really want to describe the whole cycle, as that would be a mammoth project to undertake, but here’s a general rundown of what it does.

This series of chemical reaction is used by aerobic organisms to create energy, through the oxidation of acetate, which can be formed from fats, proteins, and carbohydrates.

In eukaryotes the citric acid cycle occurs within the mitochondria, whereas in prokaryotes it occurs in the cytosol.